• Journal Archive

 

I am Tyler Roi, a creative director, artist and photographer born and raised in NOLA and am currently 24 years old.

 

I have lived in this city my entire life(23) years and the level of intricacy and detail put into Zulu/Mardi gras costume pieces still never ceases to amaze me. It's important to understand that there are people who have built their lives around handcrafting the tiniest fabrics of this tradition. 

 

Although my creativity has guided my sense of direction since I could use my hands, the true credit for these photos goes to the souls who have spent hours, days and years gearing up for this amazing annual event. I am proudly honored, like many, to be able to capture snippets of this moment once again and share them. Let the tradition live on.

 

Contact info for creative inquiries:
Tyler Roi
tyler.roi.art@gmail.com
www.tylerroi.com(under construction until March 6th)
IG @tylerart
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Featuring : Jarrad Mckay AKA Art by Jarrad

 

We're really into the work of Jarrad Mckay. We've been glad to share some custom products and prints in stores, and we're looking forward to a potential collaboration in the the future. Expect big things from him this year. He recently had a solo show at Axiom Fine Art Gallery and produced a shirt with The Loyalty Club. We're honored to have a an Art by Jay original DNO canvas on display at DNO Downtown. 

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Focus on the Photographer : Elena Ricci

 

 

"…someone contacted me about my work and wanted me to shoot their band, and it was the first time someone had seen my work and was simply asking me to do what I do, but for them. And they were like give us a quote, and I did, and they came back and wanted to pay me more than I asked for. That was the moment where I realized I can really say no to this garbage I don't want to do. I don't have to shoot if I'm not into the work because there is someone else out there that's going to pay me to do exactly what I want to do -- they appreciate it. And so, I think that when you do have to commodify creativity it's important not to lose sight of your creative voice."

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